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Engine Gasket replacement, what else to get?
#1
Hi,

After the gearbox refurb last year, this time it's sorting out the remaining oil leaks on the engine,. It's leaking oil from the rear timing chain gasket, and also the seam between the bottom of the engine and the top of the oil pan. My local garage looked over everything this morning, and in order to fix those problems they will need to replace various other gaskets, such as the rocker covers and manifolds. Will the gasket kit 102565 contain pretty much everything that they would need.? While the engine is in bits are there any other things that should be replaced while they are in there, such as the timing chain etc? I will be getting new belts/oil filter too, is there anything else worth getting sorted at the same time?

Thanks,

Simon
Simon Brewer,
DOC Member #517
VIN #4748
http://www.creatingwithlight.co.uk
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#2
Hi Simon,

I gave up using the cover gaskets years ago because they never seal properly. Renault themselves assembled the later engines with silicone instead of gaskets. I’ve never had a leak problem since using just silicone. From memory I didn't take the covers off your engine so are probably original gaskets.

The sump gasket never leaks unless the sump has been removed in the past and the original gasket put back when torn. Almost always an apparent sump gasket leak is actually dribbling down from something above and collecting on that seam. The oil pressure switch is the usual culprit. When it comes to front and rear main seals “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.

Timing chains are good for 120,000 miles.
Martin Gutkowski
DeLorean Cars
http://www.delorean.co.uk
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#3
Hi Martin,

Thanks for the tip about the cover gaskets and the timing chain. I will get the garage to use a silicone seal where appropriate. I think the current timing chain should be fine on my car.

The oil pan gasket was leaking on my car until I got it replaced last year, I suspect that it had been taken apart at some point in the past and the old seal reused. It's leak free now though!

Viewed from the back if the car, the last set of leaks are coming from the left lower part of the timing chain cover gasket, and also from the hairline seam between the top of the crankcase and the lower part of the engine block, again on the left side of the engine. There has been an attempted repair with sealant in that area, and nothing above that area seems to be leaking. The oil pressure switch isn't leaking as the whole right side of the engine is nice and dry.

Is there supposed to be a gasket at that hairline seam? I can't find one on the dmc parts store.

Normally, I wouldn't be too worried about a small drip of oil every week, but this is turning into a puddle under the car now after a day or so Sad

Still starts first time every time though Smile

thanks!

Simon
Simon Brewer,
DOC Member #517
VIN #4748
http://www.creatingwithlight.co.uk
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#4
Clutching at straws... Dipstick tube?
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#5
clutching another straw.

Air compressor pulley ....'o' ring seal on timing casing. held in by 2 bolts , the 'o' ring was leaking on mine...thought it was main casing seal at first glance. worth a closer look
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#6
Hi Simon,

The oil pressure switch is on the left side of the engine. The gauge sender is on the right, next to the oil filter.

I’ve never heard of a crank case leaking where it joins the main block – it’s face-on-face seal with a wipe of silicone. If you do split it to re-seal, make sure to align it properly when it goes back together (use the timing cover face for alignment. If it ends up a fraction out, you can crack the bell housing.

It’s engine-out to do the job, plus drain all the fluids because you have to turn it upside down. Boooo.
Martin Gutkowski
DeLorean Cars
http://www.delorean.co.uk
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#7
Thanks for all the advice. I really don't want to have to have the engine split at the crackcase there as that sounds like a pig of a job to do Sad

I will get the garage to replace the timing chain gasket as that is definately leaking, and get them to have another look at the air compressor pulley and dipstick areas.

Cheers,

Simon
Simon Brewer,
DOC Member #517
VIN #4748
http://www.creatingwithlight.co.uk
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#8
Just looked up the location of the oil pressure switch - its directly above the area where the oil is collecting so thats a good sign...! To my untrained eye the part looks just like a bolt to me, probably why I haven't noticed it before. (I was confusing that with the oil sender on the other side of the engine... sorry! Sad ) I will have another look under the car tonight.

Cheers,

Simon
Simon Brewer,
DOC Member #517
VIN #4748
http://www.creatingwithlight.co.uk
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#9
Quote:Just looked up the location of the oil pressure switch - its directly above the area where the oil is collecting so thats a good sign
As Martin wrote above, these are rubbish and do leak often. problem with oil leaks is it's difficult to see exactly where it is coming from. If it was me I would just replace this cheap switch (10 min job) as see what happens!
Hear you go: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/OIL-PRESSURE- ... 2ec10a92e7 Got to be worth trying a fiver before they start pulling your engine to bits?

Chris
Membership Secretary DOC UK
2021's DeLorean event: http://www.deloreans.co.uk/forum/showthr...p?tid=6056
VIN#15768 Ex VIN#4584
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#10
Another good idea is to spray and wipe all over the oil wet areas with a compressed canister of brake cleaner and a cloth. That stuff is great for dissolving oil and grime and cleaning up back to fresh metal. Then, it's just a case of watching to see where the new oil starts coming from after some short amount of time. :wink:
Rissy
Chris M. Morionem qui loquitur multus sine cogitatione.
(Forum Member 288)
(DOC Member 663)

May 1981 vin#1458
"LEX" aka "Wonkey" - Officially used in Britain's Greatest Machines (80's episode) with Chris Barrie.
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#11
Hi,

Just had a good look under the car - the oil switch is nice and dry, no sign of weeping oil there at all. I can't see anything above that would cause the issue. The engine is fairly clean and nice and dry above that area.

I'll get a new oil pressure switch in case that is leaking somehow. Along with changing the chain case gasket, hopefully that will fix things before I do anything more drastic. Maybe oil is leaking from the gasket and then flowing forwards under the engine due to airflow pressure oddities.

Cheers,

Simon
Simon Brewer,
DOC Member #517
VIN #4748
http://www.creatingwithlight.co.uk
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#12
Don't bother with a gasket, just use silicone. Trust me. :wink:
Martin Gutkowski
DeLorean Cars
http://www.delorean.co.uk
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